Listen to your librarian!

A couple of reviews today, one of which–A Killing in the Hills by Julia Keller–was a “Staff Pick” at my local library. As I discuss in my review, I was pleasantly surprised.

Thanks for reading!

A Killing in the Hills  (Bell Elkins, #1)A Killing in the Hills by Julia Keller

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I picked this up because of a librarian recommendation, and it was a good read. Interesting characters, good descriptions and a story that kept me turning the pages. This is apparently the first of a series and since I’m not a big fan of mysteries and this one wrapped up nicely for me at the end, I’ll probably stop with this one. However, since it’s better than most, I’d recommend it for fans of the genre.

Book Description (from Goodreads):

In A Killing in the Hills, a powerful, intricate debut from Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Julia Keller, a mother and a daughter try to do right by a town and each other before it’s too late.

What’s happening in Acker’s Gap, West Virginia? Three elderly men are gunned down over their coffee at a local diner, and seemingly half the town is there to witness the act. Still, it happened so fast, and no one seems to have gotten a good look at the shooter.  Was it random? Was it connected to the spate of drug violence plaguing poor areas of the country just like Acker’s Gap? Or were Dean Streeter, Shorty McClurg, and Lee Rader targeted somehow? One of the witnesses to the brutal incident was Carla Elkins, teenaged daughter of Bell Elkins, the prosecuting attorney for Raythune County, WV. Carla was shocked and horrified by what she saw, but after a few days, she begins to recover enough to believe that she might be uniquely placed to help her mother do her job.

After all, what better way to repair their fragile, damaged relationship? But could Carla also end up doing more harm than good—in fact, putting her own life in danger?

 

The Book ThiefThe Book Thief by Markus Zusak

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I had little trouble getting into the POV of this story but once I did the pages flew by. Great story with great characters, vivid descriptions and exceptional writing. For me, poor endings are kind of a pet peeve but the ending to The Book Thief was amazing. It flowed organically from the story and struck the right emotional chords. It was also refreshing to read about WW2 from the perspective of ordinary German citizens. Highly recommended.

Book Description (from Goodreads):

It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will be busier still.

By her brother’s graveside, Liesel’s life is changed when she picks up a single object, partially hidden in the snow. It is The Gravedigger’s Handbook, left behind there by accident, and it is her first act of book thievery.

So begins a love affair with books and words, as Liesel, with the help of her accordian-playing foster father, learns to read. Soon she is stealing books from Nazi book-burnings, the mayor’s wife’s library, wherever there are books to be found.

But these are dangerous times. When Liesel’s foster family hides a Jewish fist-fighter in their basement, Liesel’s world is both opened up, and closed down.

In superbly crafted writing that burns with intensity, award-winning author Markus Zusak has given us one of the most enduring stories of our time.

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